Composting

Common-Sense Compost Making by the Quick Return Method

by Maye E. Bruce

Synopsis

This book describes a way of making compost, i.e. humus, which is simply, labour saving (no turning) and quick, both in ripening the compost and in getting results in the soil. It is adaptible to all conditions and to every size and type of garden, allotment or farm, the process being based on nature’s own methods.

Miss Bruce tells how to make use of the natural heat of disintegration, which liberates the vitality of the plants; how to retain that vitality within the heap, and how to quicken both the disintegration of plants and the energizing of humus by treating the heap with a simple activator. This is a herbal solution which contains in living plant form the chief elements necessary to plant life; formulae are given.

From Vegetable Waste to Fertile Soil affirms a belief in the universality of Life, this Life being manifest in varying ‘rhythms’ in the mineral, vegetable, animal and human kingdoms. Health, productivity and perfection of growth in the vegetable kingdom, says the author, can best be achieved by feeding plants within the ‘rhythm’ of this kingdom.

Common-Sense Compost Making by the Quick Return Method

A 1-acre self-sufficient small-holding

Start-a-1-acre-self-sufficient-homestead

We’re shopping for land in Hungary and while prices are relatively low, when compared to those in Scotland, it’s possible that our budget will only stretch to a 1-, or 2-acre plot. Ideally we’re looking for 4 or 5 acres minimum however 1 or 2 acres will be suitable.

With this in mind I’m collecting information and learning how to “survive” on smaller plots.

Download: Start-a-1-acre-self-sufficient-homestead

How to grow …

Quinoa

How to grow quinoa

Quinoa, pronounced “keen-wa”, and its seeds are high in protein which makes it a nutritious grain to grow. The protein is considered a “complete” protein, a rarity in the plant world. It’s leaves are also edible. This makes quinoa a popular food among vegans and vegetarians.
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Amaranth

How to grow amaranth

Amaranth that is grown as a grain crop is related to but not the same as the smaller plant grown for its flowers. Taller grain amaranth does still have the same brilliant colors and flowers though.

It’s not a kind of grass as most grains are, but amaranth is grouped together with the other grains anyway. Amaranth seeds are very high in protein, and its a very high-quality protein closer to what you find in soybeans. Unlike other grain plants, amaranth is quite attractive and blooms in shades of red, burgundy, and purple before the cascading spikes of flowers go to seed. The seeds are the grain that you will be harvesting.

Amaranth can be cooked in various ways, either mixed in dishes or just served by itself like you might do with rice. You can also grind amaranth for a gluten-free flour that makes great pasta. Aside from the protein, amaranth is also high in fiber, iron and phosphorus.